Immigration through education

Pavel Z.

New Member
Hello, I'm sorry if I'm posting this in the wrong thread.
I am looking to move to Canada and so far the only options I have are thought a study permit. I have an associate's degree in electrical engineering, but every job offer I've found online is asking for someone with Canadian electrical license. I've then decided to try the study visa route, since I've found I'm ineligible for a express entry visa. Now, I've been reading here on the forum that I must also prove to the IIRC officer that I have ties to my home country, which is not hard, I own a car here and have family here, but I am looking to immigrate, 100%. I've got my IELTS exam and, and I'm not sure if I should translate my degree or my high school diploma, since some colleges ask for one or the other.
My question is, is there anywhere I can go to online to figure out how's the trade market is looking like in Canada right now? Some people I know that have left for Canada years ago are coming back now since they can't really find employment right now due to covid, but most of them aren't tradespeople. I don't mind studying a new trade.
Another question I have is about the Red Seal. I can't find a way online to apply, otherwise I'd try to get an electrical license before even coming to Canada.
I've also been told about different lawyer groups that "promise" to get you into Canada but most of them are scams, so the best option seems to be education.
The Nova Scotia Community College seems to be inexpensive, but I would like to know what I should study.
Thanks in advance.
 

Riley Haas

Administrator
Staff member
What you can do is pick a province you're interested in and contact the electrician's professional association for that province, they will likely have job information.

Have you looked at the qualifications for the Federal Skilled Trades program or just Federal Skilled Worker? (Both operate through Express Entry.)

I don't believe Red Seal exams are offered online: http://www.red-seal.ca/resources/r.2g.3st.2r-eng.html

Do not listen to anyone who promises they can get you here. There are never any guarantees. You're right, that's a sure sign of a scam.
 

Pavel Z.

New Member
Thank you for your reply. I can also go to job offer websites and see positions there, but all of them require a Canadian electrical license. What I was trying to ask is if there's anyway to find out what trades are in demand in Canada, and chose the one that will increase my chances of getting a work visa after finishing the post graduation work permit. I can afford to go to a trade school, I'd just like to know what I should study. Personal preferences are irrelevant, since my primary goal is immigration.
I have looked at the express entry visa, I tried to go thought their online simulator but it seems that no matter what I chose I'm ineligible for any of them. I assume that since I don't have many years of experience in the field. I was working in the merchant navy for only half a year, so that barely counts, then I was forced to serve in the army, and while I was an electrician there, nobody considers army working experience as real working experience. I've been working in a "real" company for about a year and a half now, so if the express entry visa is asking for 5 years of experience or more then I can't go through with it. I want to leave my country of origin as soon as possible, so going to a 2 year trade school in Canada and getting employment after college is the best legal way to get in.
Thank you for your time
 

Pavel Z.

New Member
I just ran the simulator again for the express entry visa, and I've noticed that there is a strong emphasis on either having a Canadian diploma or having Canadian work experience, because I do have two years of work in a profession that has a NOC of 72, and my IELTS results are around 8 overall. I've looked into the Red Seal, it appears that I need to contact the authority in the specific province I'd wish to immigrate to, but there are still no promises that my work experience will be validated.
Getting a Canadian diploma seems like the safest way, though the most time and money consuming one.
Thank you for your reply
 

Riley Haas

Administrator
Staff member
You're right about it being the longest route, and likely the most expensive.

You can do both: you can start looking at schools and have an active Express Entry profile even while you study in Canada.
 
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