Place to settle in Canada

Kumar

New Member
Hi there. Myself and my family are currently in USA and we are planning to move to Canada in near future once all these pandemic situation is over. I would like to get the expert opinion on where to settle in Canada. Basically I am in tech industry and can work from home in Canada. My preference would be the job opportunities in the tech industry and good high school and Grad education in Canada as my kid is now in middle school. On my preference, could you please suggest which place with low cost we can immigrate?
 

Riley Haas

Well-Known Member
A couple of things:
  • If you can work from home entirely - you rarely if ever have to commute - then you can save a lot of money on real estate costs by living in a smaller, more remote place. Basically, the bigger the city, the higher the costs, for the most part. (Vancouver is more expensive than the larger Toronto and Montreal because they have less land and they are not in Quebec. Otherwise, this rule is mostly true. Quebec and the Maritimes are cheaper overall, too.)
  • You should know, however, that some other costs of living (groceries, gas, etc) are higher outside of the major metropolitan areas. That usually doesn't make up for the fact that your rent/mortgage is way lower, but it's something to keep in mind.
  • High schools in Canada are pretty standard. Your child will get a slightly different curriculum from province to province but, unless you are moving to Quebec, schooling is pretty standard. Don't believe this idea that there are "bad" and "good" schools like there are in the US. Funding is provincial (i.e. state level) so there aren't these giant funding discrepancies from school to school. (There could be other discrepancies, though. For one thing, good teachers may not want to live in small towns. I have no idea whether or not that's true, but it might be.)
  • Undergraduate education in Canada is not going to vary as much from school to school as the US, either. The big difference is class sizes. The smaller the school, the better the class sizes, for the most part. (Yes, the biggest schools have the "name" professors, but these professors are not there to teach undergraduates, right? At least for the most part. They're there to do research and work with grad students.)
Hope this helps.
 

Kumar

New Member
Wow Riley. That was a detailed information. I really appreciate your help on this.
I have got many details from you post and would like to explore what you have said.
Though I am going to work from home, I thought if I stay somewhere in Toronto (my company is located in Mississauga), I can visit office once in a while. That being said, I would need good schools nearby for my kid education which always comes first and then I don't want to stay in the heart of the city as you said. So my preference is always in the priority - good schools - tech job opportunities - low cost of living
 

Riley Haas

Well-Known Member
So if you're anywhere near Toronto you're not going to get a low cost of living. The suburbs are cheaper than the city itself but something strange has happened in the pandemic: people working from home have decided that they don't need to live in Toronto any more. What that means is that house prices are skyrocketing in the cities outside of Toronto. (I don't know if rent is increasing in the same way. Rent in Toronto itself has decreased slightly due to people not having any money but I don't know what is happening outside of the city proper.) So, unfortunately, it is a really bad time to buy in the immediate suburbs of Toronto. Here's a map: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Toronto_Area

As I said about schools, I don't know how much difference there truly is. Other parents are going to tell you that some schools are much better than others. And at least one Canadian think tank has a rating system for elementary schools which people think is legitimate https://www.fraserinstitute.org/school-performance / https://www.compareschoolrankings.org/

However, let me just say that, as a former student of the Ontario school system, this is all bullshit. (Or, at least, it was bullshit twenty years ago.) I had a massively different education in junior high (aka senior school, 7-8) because I attended what is known as an "alternative school". But, otherwise, my education at my elementary school was not distinctly better or worse than my friends', who went to other elementary schools. Moreover, I went to a "good" public high school, supposedly one of the best public high schools in Toronto. There was grade-rigging and there was very little adequate preparation for university on the social sciences/humanities side. (Math and science education were quite good, as was the standard in these types of "collegiate" schools across the province.)

Given that funding is pretty consistent across regions and much of how your kid does is up to individual teachers, I'm not sure you can rely on the claims made about one school being better than another. But I could be wrong.
 
Top