Temporary residence visa Invitation

Aash

New Member
Hi, my Indian citizen wife and I(Canadian by passport) work in New Zealand full time (Work visa holders) and planning to visit my family(My Sister, Mom, and Dad) in Canada for a couple of months.
My wife needs a visitor visa to Canada (She is on an open work visa)

My Sister wants us to join her this summer at our place in Toronto.

Question: Am I suppose to invite my wife or my sister OR both of us?
 

Riley Haas

Active Member
You do not need a visa or invitation letter due to your Canadian citizenship.

Your wife needs a visa as you know. An invitation letter from your sister in Canada would make sense if you were not traveling with her but, in this case, I'm not sure it would help, given your citizenship. From what you said it sounds like you are just going home to visit, so your wife accompanying you on this visit makes sense. I guess you could write a letter for her visa application, explaining that you are visiting your family, you want her to come with you, and you are then returning to New Zealand.

Your wife will have to prove she is returning to New Zealand as part of the application process. Proving that you are also returning to New Zealand will help, as the officer reviewing the application may assume that you are coming to Canada so that you can sponsor her for PR in Canada, rather than the stated purpose of the trip, if you don't prove you are returning to New Zealand.

Does that make sense?

Please keep in mind, I am just the webmaster, and not a lawyer or RCIC.
 

Aash

New Member
Yes, Agreed with you! As quoted 'as the officer reviewing the application may assume that you are coming to Canada so that you can sponsor her for PR in Canada' The main intention is, to apply for PR inland while on a visitor's (TRV).
I am so glad I found your forum and having someone thinking over my thoughts.
 

Riley Haas

Active Member
So there's something called "dual intent," which is that a visitor can both intend to comply with the visitor visa rules (i.e. she will leave when the visa expires) and also intends to become a PR. If the officer knows of your intention to marry, they also have to know that your wife intends to comply either way, i.e. she will leave if the sponsorship application fails. That's my understanding anyway. (This is more important at the port of entry than during the visa application, I believe, but, again, I am just the webmaster.)
 

Aash

New Member
Right!! I am on the website reading their article. Webmaster?? Super webmaster! I will reply soon after understanding this part.
My main concern is to get home in April coz mom's knee surgery needs to take place and my sister is full time 50 hours payroll, employee. Needs her daughter in law and son.

Thanks a billion!
 

Riley Haas

Active Member
Webmaster: I admin the websites, including this one. I have no actual expertise or certification in immigration, just know some stuff because I work for those that do.

Well, you can always sponsor whenever. If you want to get home to look after her, she should make that clear as the purpose of the trip. Again, it's important to prove she will return to New Zealand before her entry expires (less than 6 months).
 

Aash

New Member
Agreed! And I have got a clear picture of what I was expecting from the immigration Canada. As in New Zealand, Immigration has the flexibility to bring one's spouse on a visitor visa with the intention to get their PR. So that while on the visitor's they needs to prove if their relationship is genuine.

Again the duration is not limited to 6 months but depends on the duration of the sponsor's visa.

Thanks again for the direction.

So I am writing a declaration for a purpose of visit from my end and she's writing her cover letter promising the intention of leaving Canada before the visa expiry and also if the PR application does not go through, in eighter condition or whichever is before.
 

Riley Haas

Active Member
I may not have been clear. Stating dual intent in the visitor visa application will, to the best of my knowledge, result in a denial. Dual intent applies at the port of entry, only if questioned about her intentions in Canada. But I am just the webmaster. You might want to speak to a lawyer or RCIC to get a better opinion.
 
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